Fly fishing shows and presentations

Hi Folks,

I continue to travel around New England giving presentations, talking to anglers about their fishing plans, and signing books. What fun. Recently, I was at the New Hampshire Fly Fishing show in Manchester NH (great show if you haven’t been), The Farmington Valley (Connecticut) Chapter of TU, and The Sebago Lake Chapter.

Next up, the Greater Boston TU chapter in Newton, Massachusetts on Feb. 27th, and a Cumberland Library presentation on March 9th. Then there will be a gap in the action as I will be bonefishing in Abaco for two weeks in late March.

Enjoy two videos that are a compilation of short video snippets of a number of waters in Vermont and Maine that I describe in my Flyfisher’s Guide to New England.

Fall Fishing is Here! Sort of.

Early September has brought a few changes from August but the one thing that hasn’t changed is the lack of rain. Mid-August brought two rainstorms to the Rangeley region that dropped over 3 inches of rain in some areas, but the ground was so dry that much of it was absorbed with little run off. Still, it did raise and stabilize river flows in some areas. However, we have had little rain now for over a week and air temperatures are rising again into the upper 70’s during the day this week.

We did have cool nights (into the low 40’s several days) and water temperatures are dropping with rivers and streams falling into the 60’s. As a result some spawning fish are starting to move. Anglers are hooking a few nice fish in the upper Magalloway, a few nice salmon in the lower Kennebago, and seeing some big trout in the upper stretches.

Best bet is to fish early in the morning, be patient, and be satisfied with maybe one or two nice fish.

Fish are also starting to move into shallower water in the lakes and ponds and people are reporting the beginning of good action – although still with mostly smaller fish. Today on Kennebago it was cloudless, 75 degrees, and calm, but fish were rising at mid-day as tiny trico-like mayflies emerged in shallow water and mixed with a few tiny flying ants. Go figure.

In literary news, my new book is becoming more widely available and is now found in most fly-shops, sporting goods stores, and specialty book stores in New Hampshire, Maine, and Massachusetts including Bass Pro in NH, and Kittery Trading Post. Not LLBean yet. If you don’t see it at your favorite store – ask for it! Of course, you can always buy it directly from me. Good luck with your September fishing and keep praying for a good tropical storm to reach northern New England.

Updates

Let me update folks on several things…

First, I will be giving presentations at the Maine Sportsman Show in Augusta on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, April 1, 2 and 3. Check the schedule on their website. Friday and Saturday my presentation will be “20 Great Fly Fishing Locales that You haven’t Heard of.” Sunday’s presentation will be “Tactics and Locations to Catch Trophy Brook Trout.” I will also be at the Maine Sportsman’s booth Sunday morning and probably other times as well.

Second, I will also be at the Sebago Lake Trout Unlimited Conservation Event/Dinner/Auction on Saturday, April 2 from 4:30 pm. or so on. I will be signing books and wandering around.

Third, let me update you on my books. My first book, “Flyfishing Northern New England’s Seasons,” has been sold out just about everywhere, but the 3rd printing is arriving this week, and will be shipping to stores that have run out. I will have some to sell directly as well and anyone who attended recent talks of mine when they were not available can contact me and I will ship them out to you. My new book, “Fly Fisher’s Guide to New England,” a where-to-go book goes to the printer this week, will be available in Kindle version the week after that, and in the stores to buy in early May. This book is the reason why I have not been seen around much recently. It was an unbelievable amount of work: 4 states, 369 pages of 8 by 11 format, 80 maps, 400 photographs, over 1000 waters described, hatch charts, 100 vacation suggestions, 100 beginner and easy-access suggestions, and a dozen fly patterns. Just the Table of Contents and Indexes are over 10 double column pages. I have been spending some long days doing the final editing, and I  look forward to receiving feedback from readers.

Fourth, The April Issue of the Maine Sportsman is well worth buying. I supplied the cover and this is the issue with the fish stocking section. But also fun is some of the April Fools articles and columns – look for them.

Ice-out finally and other news

Ice-out is official. For all practical purposes, ice was almost all gone on Rangeley, Mooselookmeguntic, and Kennebago on May 6th or 7th.

I was guiding on Wednesday and didn’t see too many signs of smelt however. Water temps were below 40 on the Rangeley River in the morning but with air temps approaching 80 degrees in the afternoon, water temps were 43 on the Rangeley and Magalloway Rivers by afternoon. By the time you are reading this, I am sure the fishing has picked up.

Everyone anticipated potential flooding from the snowmelt but with little rain falling in the last two months, it didn’t happen. Now with the lakes low, dam operators are trying to refill them and some river levels are low. It is hard to believe given the amount of snow that we had. Mooselookmeguntic Lake is at least four feet low, but maybe this is intentional due to the Upper Dam work being done. This will limit fishing opportunities on the Rangeley River if it stays at that level.

The best thing about giving presentations and signing books at fly fishing shows an Trout Unlimited chapter meetings is all of the interesting people you meet including talented outfitters and guides, some of who you end up fishing with. Over time, I will introduce some of them to you.

Brian, owner of Pheasant Tail Tours (www.pheasanttailtours.com) and Harry, owner of Berkshire Rivers Fly Fishing (www.berkshireriversflyfishing.com) have introduced me to Massachusetts fly fishing. People from northern New England don’t think about going to Massachusetts to fish, but that is a mistake. Mass. rivers fish better early and late in the season then more northern climes and you can extend your season.

The Deerfield River is a great river to float for rainbows and browns, and the Hoosic and Housatonic Rivers are being rediscovered for their very nice brown trout fishing. There are other options as well and Brian and Harry can take you there on either wading or float trips. I have been enjoying my time fishing in Massachusetts – you don’t get a lot of chances at holdover brown trout or rainbows in Maine.

Upcoming Speaking Engagements

The famous West Branch of the Penobscot

Here is a list of my upcoming speaking engagements. All of these are open to the public, in the case of Evening Sun Fly Shop presentation, call to let them know you are coming.

March 12: Hammonasset Chapter of Trout Unlimited, 540 Oregon Road, Meriden, Ct. at 7:00. This presentation is “How and Where to Catch Trophy Brook Trout”

March 22: Evening Sun Fly Shop, www.eveningsunflyshop.com for more information, 10:30 – 2:00. I will be leading a flytying class and presenting highlights from my book.

March 27,28,29 at the Maine Sportsman Show at the Augusta Civic Center, check out their website for exact times. My presentation will be “How and Where to Catch Trophy Brook Trout”

April 11: Sebago Lake Trout Unlimited annual Banquet, from 4 to 4:20 presenting book highlights and signing books. Check Out their website for more information.

If you haven’t yet caught any of my presentations, here is your chance. Some of the photographs I use make you long for fishing season even more than you already are. I might use the one posted here as the cover of my next book. Melt snow, melt!