Fly fishing shows and presentations

Hi Folks,

I continue to travel around New England giving presentations, talking to anglers about their fishing plans, and signing books. What fun. Recently, I was at the New Hampshire Fly Fishing show in Manchester NH (great show if you haven’t been), The Farmington Valley (Connecticut) Chapter of TU, and The Sebago Lake Chapter.

Next up, the Greater Boston TU chapter in Newton, Massachusetts on Feb. 27th, and a Cumberland Library presentation on March 9th. Then there will be a gap in the action as I will be bonefishing in Abaco for two weeks in late March.

Enjoy two videos that are a compilation of short video snippets of a number of waters in Vermont and Maine that I describe in my Flyfisher’s Guide to New England.

Fall Fishing is Here! Sort of.

Early September has brought a few changes from August but the one thing that hasn’t changed is the lack of rain. Mid-August brought two rainstorms to the Rangeley region that dropped over 3 inches of rain in some areas, but the ground was so dry that much of it was absorbed with little run off. Still, it did raise and stabilize river flows in some areas. However, we have had little rain now for over a week and air temperatures are rising again into the upper 70’s during the day this week.

We did have cool nights (into the low 40’s several days) and water temperatures are dropping with rivers and streams falling into the 60’s. As a result some spawning fish are starting to move. Anglers are hooking a few nice fish in the upper Magalloway, a few nice salmon in the lower Kennebago, and seeing some big trout in the upper stretches.

Best bet is to fish early in the morning, be patient, and be satisfied with maybe one or two nice fish.

Fish are also starting to move into shallower water in the lakes and ponds and people are reporting the beginning of good action – although still with mostly smaller fish. Today on Kennebago it was cloudless, 75 degrees, and calm, but fish were rising at mid-day as tiny trico-like mayflies emerged in shallow water and mixed with a few tiny flying ants. Go figure.

In literary news, my new book is becoming more widely available and is now found in most fly-shops, sporting goods stores, and specialty book stores in New Hampshire, Maine, and Massachusetts including Bass Pro in NH, and Kittery Trading Post. Not LLBean yet. If you don’t see it at your favorite store – ask for it! Of course, you can always buy it directly from me. Good luck with your September fishing and keep praying for a good tropical storm to reach northern New England.

Guiding Season

June is the height of the guiding season and the days can be long when it gets light at 4 A.M. and it is still light enough to fish at 8 P.M. This year has brought some hot days and a few very cold nights, but not very much rain. As a result, the fishing has been hot and cold. I have guided in a location where we didn’t see a sign of a fish, and then half an hour later another angler in the same place with a similar fly pattern, caught a half a dozen nice fish. I guided one person to a small river pool and we caught nothing, and then the next day, in the same pool, I guided two folks that caught 50 fish.

I had a few slow days, but a few successes as well. On the lower Magalloway River one weekend, when the fish were being pounded and fishing was slow, I had an angler who I taught the classic wet fly swing. On his first cast, he landed a beautiful 18-inch wild brook trout a size-18 wet fly – on the first cast!

I had a few new fly fishers who caught their first trout. Always an exciting event and a rewarding one for the guide.

Salmon started moving in the middle Magalloway River after a recent rain and I hope that they do the same on the Kennebago River because they haven’t as of yet.

My new book is finally arriving into my hands towards the end of this week. Then, I will be shipping it out and sending it to retailers ASAP. Enjoy the peak of the fishing season. Fish well and fish often.

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An excited client with a nice brook trout hooked on a dry fly.

Hatches Finally Start in Earnest

Hatches are at full swing now in the Rangeley Area with early season mayflies – Hendricksons, Quill Gordons, March Browns, or similar mayflies hatching regularly when conditions warrant –sometimes morning and sometimes afternoon.

The first really warm day on May 12 brought the first surface activity to Kennebago Lake. I had one of those magical evenings that sometimes one is fortunate enough to experience. I was the only one fishing on the entire lake, it was an 80 degree day and warm evening without a cloud in the sky. As the sun started to set, the lake was flat calm around the western shore. Two bald eagles watched me from a nearby tall white pine tree as fish cruised just under the surface sipping midges and other small fare. Every cast to a rise resulted in a fish. In the cold water they fought hard and some towed the canoe. I happily lost count of how many came to hand. It was so perfect, I half expected Kevin Costner to come out of a field of corn on the bank and ask me if this was heaven (that was a Field of Dreams film reference).

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Then on Monday, May 16th, the area had 3 inches of snow and temps in the 20’s and 30’s and howling winds. And I do mean howling – Mooseluckmeguntic Lake had 6 foot waves. On the following Wednesday, the temp of the water had fallen to 44 degrees in the rivers and all of the hatches just stopped

But by last weekend, May 21st, the weather warmed and hatches commenced again including on Saturday afternoon a huge fly ant hatch on the upper river. 4 anglers fishing there caught 10 massive brook trout over two pounds in just several hours.

By the middle of this week, blizzard hatches of early season mayflies were everywhere. I guided yesterday and my sport had a 30 trout (at least) afternoon – not telling you where. My only concern is that we have had no rain and the rivers are at summer levels already – just like the last two springs. We need rain…

Enjoy the fishing…Lou

The Dog River

I fished Vermont’s Dog River last week, a tributary of the Winooski River that I cover in my book, “Flyfishers Guide to New England.” It is a beautiful river with aqua-marine deeper pools and large trout. The wild trout are not numerous and very spooky and hard to fool when a full-blown hatch is not occurring. It seems like a one trout per pool type of deal and it feels a little bit like stalking fish in New Zealand although the fish are not as large. My friend Dave Durovich (a great guide in the area and a great guy) and I spooked a few, he briefly hooked a very large rainbow nymphing, and I landed a very energetic 18- inch rainbow on an olive soft-hackle streamer. Alas, no photograph. I also spent a little time nymphing the upper Winooski – a small river/stream that is really fun to fish. One chunky wild rainbow succumbed to my high-stick nymphing although the release was of the long distance variety. Below are a few photos of the Dog River…IMG_1921IMG_1919IMG_1903

Hatches starting in earnest

May was a strange month in the northeast. In several states  (like Massachusetts) until the last day of the month it was going to be one of the driest months on record. In southern New England it was also one of the warmest May’s on record. Yet in Maine and northern New England it was very cold. Most of the hatch activity was late.

Fortunately, welcome rain arrived the last day of the month. I was getting concerned about real drought and the quick end to fishing season in many areas. Some streams were running at mid-summer levels. Continued rain has improved the situation considerably and early June has been cold. In Rangeley we had a number of mornings in the lower 30’s with frost in some areas and afternoon highs in only the lower 40’s

In the Rangeley area, early insects such as small black stoneflies, march browns, and even a few sulphers emerge during warm afternoons. The small tan caddis are emerging in droves on Kennebago. The lake is active with some good fish but no one is catching salmon on the river as of two days ago.

Two days ago I guided Rita, a 72 year old woman who had never fly fished. She was a very enthusiastic student but as of 8:30 had not landed a fish without help – casting, hooking, and landing by herself. On just about the last cast, she cast, hooked, landed and  released a twelve inch brook trout on a dry fly. Victory!

This has been a different spring for me because I have been traveling extensively to attend my daughter’s graduation and then her wedding, and also researching my next book. I have fished some new and very interesting water. I will share some of my learnings and photos periodically. This week I am going to Damariscotta for some smallmouth bass fishing and then on to fish northern Vermont for the weekend. Next week I will be back to Kennebago to guide for a lot of the week.

North Carolina Fishing and other matters

Hi Folks, my website is infected with some virus so some of you may see random words that are meaningless. This may force me to undertake a long overdue redo of my website.

I apologize for the long time between posts. How time flies when you are shoveling snow. Here is what the front of my house looks like.
I have been busy giving presentations around the eastern US although a few have been snowed out. I apologize to those hoping to see my presentation in Somerset NJ but I was coming down early that Saturday morning and the bulk of the snow was between NJ and Maine and I just couldn’t make it.

I was presenting at the fly fishing show in North Carolina and I had Sunday morning free before flying back to Maine. My future son-in-law and I hopped in a car to the Pisgah National Forest in the North Carolina Mountains, spent the night, and first thing in the morning were on the water at the Davidson River. We fished the stretch below the hatchery (no jokes please).

Even though the morning started cold (ice was freezing on the guides) it was just nice to be fishing. Plus, it is such an exotic environment because of the large Rhododendron bushes all around the water. Because it had been so cold, hold over browns and rainbows were stacked up in the deeper pools (it is not a big river) and there were only a few anglers around. Fishing midge pupa or emerging midge patterns under an indicator (or high-sticking with no indicator), we did well. A welcome respite from the Maine Winter.

Davidson River

August Action

Perhaps as a make-up for the lousy weather, high water, and challenging fishing during much of May, June, and even July, the fishing in August was the best that I can remember. Rangeley rivers fished well with certain pools holding a concentration of salmon and trout. Many lake fish ascended the rivers during the flushes of water from the rain and then when the water warmed into the low 70’s, they holed up near incoming cooler tribs. Colder nights in early August returned the water temps into the mid to high sixties and the fish went on a feeding spree.
Kennebago Lake fished well because hatches were late and spread out and the water stayed cool enough for fish to stay in the shallows and feed instead of decending to the thermoclines. It was ironic that with most of the anglers gone, a few lucky anglers had a number of summer evenings where they could cast to rising fish without any other boat nearby.
The lower Magalloway below the dam continued to fish well with many smaller fish falling to nymphs and dries and the occasional monster caught with big streamers or nymphs.
We have not had significant rain for some time so we now could use some precipitation to bring the start of autumn fishing although with continued cool temperatures, I am sure there are a few good fish to be caught in the lake shallows and rivers and streams.

(Sorry for the delay in posting this – I thought it had posted several weeks ago)