Welcome to the Mainely Flyfishing website, your source for guiding, instruction, fly fishing information, books, videos, and more. My name is Lou Zambello and I am a guide, instructor, writer, speaker, and columnist. Please explore this site or email me to learn more.

Early Spring Fishing

I was  really eager to hit the water early this year. So, what else is new. Given water flows and cold temps and just the need to spend some time walking in the woods, I opted to start the season with small streams in the Cumberland County area. My first foray was to a small stream in Durham that I had wanted to fish for 20 years but hadn’t. It was a beautiful weekend day and I didn’t have the place to myself and shared the largest pool with several worm dunkers and hardware slingers – all nice, friendly guys. The water was very cold and without any luck, everybody left but me. I’ll bet the sun warmed the water a bit, but I ended up catching 4 or 5 trout on a wood special and tiny pink nymph slowly retrieved. The takes were very subtle and I missed some. The trout were recent stockers but included one native trout that somehow survived last years drought.

Other small local streams also yielded at least a few wild or holdover trout including my favorite Collyer Brook in Gray and a small stream near Range Pond. A couple of the eager brookies were caught on a klinkhammer dry fly! Again, it was reassuring that at least a few trout survived the drought and can repopulate the small area streams.

In 10 days, I am off to Pennsylvania to try my hand at catching some of their famous brown-trout from famous limestone creeks. A couple of those days will be fishing Cathy and Berry Beck’s private water on Fishing Creek so I can’t wait. I will also spend time on Spruce Creek and the Letort. I will keep you posted.

Ice Out

My email these days is filled with folks asking me fishing questions so for this blog post, I will just answer them!

When was ice-out?

In the Rangeley area, it was within the last seven days, in fact higher elevations ponds still have at least a partial coating of ice. Further south, ice has been out for two weeks or so. However, the water remains cold because of cloudy days and cold nights. Patches of snow still linger in the woods in the Kennebago area.

How is the fishing?

Fishing has been slow because of high and cold water. In fact the lower Mags is running at 2000 cfs versus 350 for most of last year. I don’t know if I remember it being that high . A heavy snowpack melted quickly in Rangeley, followed by occasional rain. This is resulting in the spring run-off being closer to historical norms versus several dry springs over the last five years. While this means a slow start to moving-water fishing, it bodes well for sufficient water flows later in the year and good ground water levels.

Smelt are running in places, but perhaps not yet where water temps are still hovering around 40 degrees. Lake and pond fishing where smelt are running up brooks is where I would want to be fishing.

Does the high water mean that spring runs of salmon will push up rivers such as Kennebago?

Not necessarily. At least in Kennebago, salmon don’t really take advantage of high water flows until temps hit 50 degrees. Hopefully when the river warms up, water flows will still be high.

Do you have any fun fishing photos/stories?

Always. My guiding partner Abby from Kismet Ouftitters has been doing some drift boat guiding in western Mass. and found some really nice brown trout in the Hoosic River.IMG_3211 (2) IMG_2780

How is the new book selling?

Very well. We are going to start a second printing soon, which will allow me to update the book a little, correct a few typos and include a few more waters. “Flyfisher’s Guide to New England” can now be found in almost every fly fishing outlet in New England, but it does sell out quickly and doesn’t always find its way back onto the shelves in a timely manner. Remember, you can always purchase the book from me directly, signed of course. Just email me.

Enjoy the beginning of a new fishing season.

Lou

Spring is Sprung

First of all, I apologize for the tardy posting of my blog. Giving many fly fishing presentations and two weeks in the Bahamas bonefishing left me swamped. I am sure not a single person is feeling sorry for me.

After my bonefish adventure, I could literally write a book entitled, ” 101 Ways to Lose a Bonefish”, because I experienced them all. I lost fish to barracudas, sharks, mangrove roots, disenigrating reels, snapped backing line, broken fly-line loops, broken hooks, slack line, and fly-line loops around the fly-rod butt, just to name some of the ways. Fortunately for my ego, I did land a few as did my wife, Lindsey, and members of my family. You can see from this photo of my son-in-law and I releasing two fish, how amazingly bonefish blend into their environment. No wonder I can’t see them.IMG_0807IMG_0811

Getting back to Maine, this is the time of year when everybody is asking me about ice out. At the end of February, it looked like lakes were going to open up early. But then came March, which ended up with an average temperature below December, January, or February. Ice got thicker and then was covered with major snowfall. So now, even though the 70’s weather over Easter weekend melted much of the snow, I think the ice is going to hold out for a bit longer, particularly since this week will feature a return to colder weather. Ice is half out of the small ponds in southern Maine. Damariscotta Lake ice went out late last week. Ice out will move north over the next few weeks.

Stocking will commence in Maine in earnest this week and fishing will improve from there.

Fly fishing shows and presentations

Hi Folks,

I continue to travel around New England giving presentations, talking to anglers about their fishing plans, and signing books. What fun. Recently, I was at the New Hampshire Fly Fishing show in Manchester NH (great show if you haven’t been), The Farmington Valley (Connecticut) Chapter of TU, and The Sebago Lake Chapter.

Next up, the Greater Boston TU chapter in Newton, Massachusetts on Feb. 27th, and a Cumberland Library presentation on March 9th. Then there will be a gap in the action as I will be bonefishing in Abaco for two weeks in late March.

Enjoy two videos that are a compilation of short video snippets of a number of waters in Vermont and Maine that I describe in my Flyfisher’s Guide to New England.

Somerset Show

Hi everyone. Just a reminder that I will be at the Somerset Fly Fishing Show everyday giving a presentation and signing books. Check out the schedule on their website for times I will be giving my presentation about how and where to catch trophy brook trout – tactics, locations, seasons, and flies. Also listed are the times I will be at the author’s booth.

The Marlborough Show was last weekend and it was nice to see so many old fishing acquaintances, guiding clients, and avid readers of my books. I was told that my new  book, “Fly Fisher’s Guide to New England” was the number one selling book at the show. We just about sold out.

I have a new guiding partner, Abby. We will be hosting events together, co-marketing, and collaborating on a number of activities. She will also be subbing for me as a guide when she has time and I do not. Check out her website at www.kismetoutfitters.com

Winter Doldrums

To entertain folks during January, I will be adding some new videos. Here is one steelheading in upstate New York in a small creek with my friend Steve. Send me an email if you have a desire to steelhead away from the crowds.

Winter events

My schedule for the winter is starting to finalize. Here are some highlights:

Saturday, Dec 10th: I will be at the Rangeley Region Sport Shop all day for their open house event – tieing a few flies, signing a few books, showing some of my videos from 2016, and telling tall tales.

January 12th: I will be presenting at the Hammonasset Chapter of TU in Connecticut (hctu.org)

January 17th: I will presenting to the Pemigewasset Chapter of Trout Unlimited (pemigewasset.tu.org.

January 20,21,22: The Flyfishing Show in Marlborough, Mass: I am giving different presentations depending on the day. Friday, I have one of the big rooms and have an hour and twenty minutes to take people through a number of strategies, tactics, and flies to catch trophy brook trout.

January 27.28th, and 29th: The Flyfishing Show in Somerset, New Jersey.

I haven’t given up on the fishing either. With another fairly warm fall, fishing was comfortable in November. I had a few beautiful days fishing the upper Presumpscot River and the Saco River. Didn’t catch much however for some reason. It couldn’t be because of any lack of skill on my part so I assume the fish disappeared right before I got there.

Last week, I ventured down to one of my favorite late fall fishing spots – The Lamprey River in New Hampshire – and I finally found a few nice rainbows.img_07261.

I have also been working hard, editing video from this year including some great underwater brook trout action. they should be posted here and under the video tab in the next few weeks so check back.

Have a good holiday

End of Season

For what seems like the 3rd autumn in a row, September in the Rangeley area was dry and hot, and the trout and salmon didn’t begin to move into shallow water or run up the rivers until the last week of the season. Global climate change really seems to be impacting Maine. I remember that 20 years ago in the western Maine Mountains, by the last few days of the season all of the leaves would be off the trees, and sometimes it would spit snow and sleet. The end of September now arrives with the leaves still green and this year there wasn’t even a frost until mid-October.

I think that Maine’s Inland Fish and Wildlife Department should consider extending the regular fishing season to the first week in October. I know more water is being kept open later but prime waters are not. I don’t think extending the season by one week would negatively impact the wild fish and it would minimize the crowding during the last week in the season.

Although another “official” fly fishing season has come and gone, lots of water is still open. I guided two anglers in early October to upper Dam – still lots of heavy machinery working – but everyone there (up to 14  anglers in the late afternoon) seemed to catch a few fish. Most were 10-12 inches and very thin – I assume that they were resident to that area and that during this hot summer, the water had warmed too much for them to feed actively. A few fresh larger salmon and trout were caught – some in the 20 inch range, but I got the sense that the real movement of fish hadn’t started yet.

I have some interesting photos and videos from the end of September that I will post as time allows.

In other news, I was able to stop into a new fly shop in Lincoln, NH – right at the end of the Kancamagus Highway. This new fly shop is good news for anglers in that part of NH who did not have a fly shop anywhere close by. The name of the shop is Mountain High Fly (www.mountainhighfly.com) and the owner, Sara, seemed quite competent and enthusiastic. They are on-line only during the winter, but the shop itself will be open again in the spring. Good luck with your new endeavor, Sara!