Late July and early August Brings Summer Fishing Conditions

When water temperatures warm to the point that river and stream fishing slows down, surface activity on lakes and ponds only occurs right before dark or first thing in the morning, and stripers start moving out from tidal rivers to deeper in Casco Bay, it is time to change fly-fishing locales. or species. While I have been prioritizing stripers, they are disappearing from near shore haunts as the water warms with the warm humid nights that we have had.

People have the false perception that it is the hot days that warm the water. More often, it is when the nights stay warm and humid, and prevent waters from cooling, that create the largest upswing in water temperatures.

When larger waters warm above 68 degrees, I sometimes move to small mountain streams that stay cold all summer. Wading wet, even if the day is a scorcher, can mean numb feet after awhile.

Small stream summer fishing means a 3-weight (or smaller) rod, a handful of flies, wet wading, and lower expectations. The native and wild trout, and even the educated stockers are easily spooked and won’t be must larger than hand-sized.

But I love the carved granite plunge pools of New England; no two are ever exactly alike, and the quicksilver trout can appear as if from nowhere in liquid-crystal pools to grab my offering.

The below photos are of the upper Ammonoosuc River where on my last visit a half a dozen hand-sized rainbows rose to my Puterbaugh caddis. I didn’t land a larger rainbow from one of the pools below.IMG_0730 (2)

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The Dog River

I fished Vermont’s Dog River last week, a tributary of the Winooski River that I cover in my book, “Flyfishers Guide to New England.” It is a beautiful river with aqua-marine deeper pools and large trout. The wild trout are not numerous and very spooky and hard to fool when a full-blown hatch is not occurring. It seems like a one trout per pool type of deal and it feels a little bit like stalking fish in New Zealand although the fish are not as large. My friend Dave Durovich (a great guide in the area and a great guy) and I spooked a few, he briefly hooked a very large rainbow nymphing, and I landed a very energetic 18- inch rainbow on an olive soft-hackle streamer. Alas, no photograph. I also spent a little time nymphing the upper Winooski – a small river/stream that is really fun to fish. One chunky wild rainbow succumbed to my high-stick nymphing although the release was of the long distance variety. Below are a few photos of the Dog River…IMG_1921IMG_1919IMG_1903

Ice-out finally and other news

Ice-out is official. For all practical purposes, ice was almost all gone on Rangeley, Mooselookmeguntic, and Kennebago on May 6th or 7th.

I was guiding on Wednesday and didn’t see too many signs of smelt however. Water temps were below 40 on the Rangeley River in the morning but with air temps approaching 80 degrees in the afternoon, water temps were 43 on the Rangeley and Magalloway Rivers by afternoon. By the time you are reading this, I am sure the fishing has picked up.

Everyone anticipated potential flooding from the snowmelt but with little rain falling in the last two months, it didn’t happen. Now with the lakes low, dam operators are trying to refill them and some river levels are low. It is hard to believe given the amount of snow that we had. Mooselookmeguntic Lake is at least four feet low, but maybe this is intentional due to the Upper Dam work being done. This will limit fishing opportunities on the Rangeley River if it stays at that level.

The best thing about giving presentations and signing books at fly fishing shows an Trout Unlimited chapter meetings is all of the interesting people you meet including talented outfitters and guides, some of who you end up fishing with. Over time, I will introduce some of them to you.

Brian, owner of Pheasant Tail Tours (www.pheasanttailtours.com) and Harry, owner of Berkshire Rivers Fly Fishing (www.berkshireriversflyfishing.com) have introduced me to Massachusetts fly fishing. People from northern New England don’t think about going to Massachusetts to fish, but that is a mistake. Mass. rivers fish better early and late in the season then more northern climes and you can extend your season.

The Deerfield River is a great river to float for rainbows and browns, and the Hoosic and Housatonic Rivers are being rediscovered for their very nice brown trout fishing. There are other options as well and Brian and Harry can take you there on either wading or float trips. I have been enjoying my time fishing in Massachusetts – you don’t get a lot of chances at holdover brown trout or rainbows in Maine.